I Am Now My Own Radio Station – Radio Clash LIVE! Goes 24/7

Radio Clash is now broadcasting 24 hours, 7 days a week! Yes care of the wonderful Airtime and managing to get my old PowerPC Minimac to work with Linux (he wrote, several days later…*sigh*) …Broadcasting mostly the 2 continuous weeks / 350+ hours (!!!) of podcasts – and many more hours of mixes – but live live LIVE! on Wednesday and planning to do more live broadcasts. I also now know far too much about Linux servers than I really wanted to..

If you want a iTunes/Windows Media Player friendly link then try this or this. If it’s playing yet you hear silence let me know, I should know if the server goes down/power cut as I have an alert on the stream going down, but Airtime will happily broadcast silence…:-/

Schedule currently is podcasts apart from 6-8pm every day is ‘Mix at 6′ devoted to mixes I’ve done*, then back to podcasts until Wednesday 8pm it’s live broadcasts from me, next one this Wednesday is Queer History of Pop Part 2 (1990s-2000s).

* Let me know if you want me to play your long mixes…happily feature other people’s mixes, I have about 22 hours of mixes which means it won’t be that repetitive, but other mixes or shows always welcome…

Listen to Radio Clash Live

When I’m recording a podcast or broadcasting live you can listen to me live! Live! LIVE (or a new exclusive show) on Radio Clash Live! on Wednesdays at 9:30pm London time (GMT/UTC/GMT+1 summertime

Radio Clash is now broadcasting audio 24 hours, 7 days a week! Broadcasting mostly the 2 continuous weeks / 350+ hours (!!!) of podcasts – and many more hours of mixes from myself and friends – but live live LIVE! on Wednesday at 9:30pm with either special exclusive sets or podcast recordings, where you’ll hear the podcasts first, sometimes before they’re released for weeks. Check out the site for how to listen and the latest on shows and schedules – or click on and share the widgets below it’s Flash and HTML5-friendly depending on your browser, or use the shareable Streema player – please spread the word and post it on your site/blog/etc!

I used to broadcast a lot of sets in Second Life and also streamed Radio Clash LIVE regularly around shows 100-125 from 2007-2009, so this is a return to streaming!

Pandora, Spotify, the new devil?

Responding to this Stereogum article ‘Deconstructing: Pandora, Spotify, Piracy, And Getting Artists Paid‘ I thought I’d repost it here:

Can we look at that specific example and devise ways to make piracy less convenient for fans and less profitable for distributors, because such reform is better for our cultural health over the short-, medium-, and long-terms? Where there’s a will there’s a way. We would end up with a different Internet, in the sense that it would be a better regulated, fairer Internet of expanded opportunity for artists and legit businesses.

Don’t agree – doing a ‘Just say no’ No tolerance attitude to file-sharing won’t work, as it hasn’t with drugs – and just look at the mess over Megaupload for that – feel sorry for the legitimate users who have lost their files and the trampling of international law that took place.

I think rather than victimising fans – after all study after study has shown that the biggest pirates are the biggest paid consumers of music, rather than less – maybe you should look at the existing legit download model. Paying more for a bunch of MP3s than CDs with no warehouse costs, no printing or duplication costs is ridiculous but again and again I have a choice whether to pay more for a digital download or wait a few days then get the physical CD *for less*. This isn’t some blackmarket CD seller, this is Tescos or Sainsburys or Play.com or Amazon. That’s the biggest problem – people know how much goes to iTunes or the store, people know how little goes to the artist. That’s why I try and support bandcamp releases and self-published releases if possible since I know the artist is getting more.

The problem isn’t that the users or ‘new media gurus’ devalued the music, it’s that the industry has gouged the consumer on every format change from vinyl to CD to MP3. Sort out a fair price, or bonuses for buying physical copies (see the return of vinyl for something that bucks this end of the world trend) or special deals – a classic is buy the physical album and get a download code – simple stuff but many don’t do it. Another is for record companies to release their back catalogues.

Again and again I’d happily pay for some rare 12? mix or long deleted album as a nice fresh digital download which goes to the artist and estate rather than some Popsike/Discogs chancer with a dodgy scratched copy – but again and again I’m dismayed. Bootlegs (of the original sort) and the like should have been history YEARS ago….there is hardly any cost for a label to release it’s entire catalogue digitally. But it seems so many records still remain as scratchy vinyl rips unless you want to spend hundreds of pounds on ‘rare’ vinyl which I care little for. I want the contents, the format or special japanese pressing made of uranium and pubic hair interests me not.

So solve those and I think the record labels will eventually be in rude health. But keep this mindset of only releasing the newest thing and ‘deleting’ the old (some of the most expensive things I’ve come across recently were DVDs or CDs only released a few years ago and going for a pretty penny now – surely we should be past such things in this digital age? Nope…) then of course they’ll struggle because they’re not actually benefiting from any of this, nor even being able to measure demand on older or not-so-old catalogues because they are deleted.

I would make it so the copyright laws were changed that if you didn’t exploit that right within a certain period you lose it – i.e. after release date, you need to keep it on sale otherwise the right either reverts to the artist or goes public domain. This would stop record labels holding onto albums for aeons, and mean a new artist-friendly secondary market would prevail….or at least mean long-lost careers might be salvaged from the industry.

GYBO/Bastard Interviews

Inspired by my GYBO RIP show (well that’s what C-Tel told my anyway ;-) his Acid Ted blog is interviewing all the legendary Bastard/GYBO crowd from the early days – he’s already had great interviews with Ben Soundhog (part 1 and part 2), Frenchbloke (part 1 & part 2) Andy Dunproofin (part 1 and part 2) and most recently Mike Cartel of Cartel Communique – wha ran the legendary King Of The Boots and Bastard nights that kicked off this whole mashup (then bastard pop or bootleg) scene so many years ago.

King of the Boots was too early for me but I was a part of Bastard’s sweaty wonderful nonsense and can attest of their brilliance – and like Soundhog & Mike states, a lot of the ‘career’ and money/business side is what eventually killed it – a bit like podcasting did at around the same time with Apple and iTunes, you had the likes of MTV & big media muscling in and it all got a little nasty and strange. At the time those (who aren’t seen for dust now) who wanted to ‘monetize’ their mashups, nights and podcasts thought it strange and we were being intentionally ‘indie’ and jealous of their ‘success’. I think in both spheres, mashup and podcast, that the originators still have a love for it and support it in the main is testament to what we were trying to do, and that we all had a different and more radical ideas of a possible future in mind. Putting money to that seemed to profane the messy, chaotic, lo-fi, impossible and illegal wondrousness of it all.


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